Yifat Prut Lab

ELSC Members

Laboratory of Motor Control

Movement is an essential component of our daily lives. All kinds of movements, including locomotion, reaching for objects, communicating verbally, or even making subtle facial gestures require coordination across large numbers of muscles. The nervous system is able to perform these tasks in a rapid, precise and adaptable manner. Our lab investigates the mechanisms that generate the appropriate patterns of neural activity that underlie movement, and the consequences of damage or the malfunctioning of this system.  

The motor cortex is considered the grand orchestrator of motor behavior. However, the motor cortex is not an autonomous structure but rather relies heavily on other brain areas to translate motor goals into actions. The motor cortex receives signals from other cortical and subcortical structures which contain information about the external environment and the internal state of the body. Processed information is then sent to the spinal circuitry which translates and transforms the descending motor commands into spatiotemporal signals to activate the muscles.

Our lab is interested in the interplay between local motor cortical computation and long-range descending and ascending connectivity. Specifically, we investigate (1) how descending motor cortical activity is translated into action by the spinal cord; (2) how long-range ascending inputs from subcortical structures gain a powerful impact on motor timing and coordination; and (3) the degree of universality of the control policy used by the system for controlling different effectors, such as face vs. hand. 

We use advanced experimental techniques to probe the system which include simultaneous recordings from large groups of cells located at remote but connected sites of the motor system. By using electrophysiological, pharmacological and mechanical perturbations we identify long-range connectivity patterns and the information conveyed via these pathways, the structures of the local cortical circuitry and the events that occur when specific routes are reversibly blocked.

Our long-term goal is to identify how the microscopic structures of motor cortical circuitry dictate and shape macroscopic patterns of motor cortical activity and hence movement.

Yifat Prut

Professor

Phone: +972-2-6757912
Fax: +972-2-6439736
Address: The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences
The Suzanne and Charles Goodman Brain Sciences Building,
Level 3, Room 1304A Edmond J. Safra Campus,
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 9190401
Laboratory of Motor Control

Movement is an essential component of our daily lives. All kinds of movements, including locomotion, reaching for objects, communicating verbally, or even making subtle facial gestures require coordination across large numbers of muscles. The nervous system is able to perform these tasks in a rapid, precise and adaptable manner. Our lab investigates the mechanisms that generate the appropriate patterns of neural activity that underlie movement, and the consequences of damage or the malfunctioning of this system.  

The motor cortex is considered the grand orchestrator of motor behavior. However, the motor cortex is not an autonomous structure but rather relies heavily on other brain areas to translate motor goals into actions. The motor cortex receives signals from other cortical and subcortical structures which contain information about the external environment and the internal state of the body. Processed information is then sent to the spinal circuitry which translates and transforms the descending motor commands into spatiotemporal signals to activate the muscles.

Our lab is interested in the interplay between local motor cortical computation and long-range descending and ascending connectivity. Specifically, we investigate (1) how descending motor cortical activity is translated into action by the spinal cord; (2) how long-range ascending inputs from subcortical structures gain a powerful impact on motor timing and coordination; and (3) the degree of universality of the control policy used by the system for controlling different effectors, such as face vs. hand. 

We use advanced experimental techniques to probe the system which include simultaneous recordings from large groups of cells located at remote but connected sites of the motor system. By using electrophysiological, pharmacological and mechanical perturbations we identify long-range connectivity patterns and the information conveyed via these pathways, the structures of the local cortical circuitry and the events that occur when specific routes are reversibly blocked.

Our long-term goal is to identify how the microscopic structures of motor cortical circuitry dictate and shape macroscopic patterns of motor cortical activity and hence movement.

Nashef A, Mitelman R, Harel R, Joshua M, Prut Y.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Feb 9;118(6):e2012658118. (2021)

Nashef A, Cohen O, Harel R, Israel Z, Prut Y

Cell Reports, Volume 27, Issue 9, Pages 2608-2619.e4 (2019)

Nashef A, Cohen O, Israel Z, Harel R, Prut Y

Cell report, 3(5):1275-1285 (2018)

Nashef A, Rapp H, Nawrot MP, Prut Y

Biological Cybernetics, Volume 112, Issue 1–2, pp 141–152 (2018)

Cohen O, Harel R, Aumann TD, Israel Z, Prut Y

Journal of Neurophysiology, Volume 118, Issue 1, Pages 254-266 (2017)

Yoles-Frenkel M, Avron M, Prut Y

Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, 10:1 (2016)

Aumann TD, Prut Y

Trends in Neurosciences, Volume 38, Issue 2, Pages 77-85 (2015)

Ruach R, Mitelman R, Sherman E, Cohen O, Prut Y

Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Volume 254, Pages 10-17 (2015)

Adler A, Finkes I, Katabi S, Prut Y, Bergman H

Journal of Neuroscience, 33 (11) 4854-4866 (2013)

Adler A, Katabi S, Finkes I, Prut Y, Bergman H

Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 7:47 (2013)

Adler A, Katabi S, Finkes I, Israel Z, Prut Y, Bergman H.

Journal of Neuroscience, 32 (7) 2473-2484; (2012)

Shalit, U, Zinger N, Joshua M, Prut Y.

Cerebral Cortex, Volume 22, Issue 8, Pages 1904–1914 (2011)

Adler, A, Joshua M, Rivlin-Etzion M, Mitelman R, Marmor O, Prut Y, Bergman H.

Journal of neurophysiology. 103(1):346-59 (2010)

Joshua M, Adler A, Prut Y, Vaadia E, Wickens JR, Bergman H.

Neuron. 62(5):695-704 (2009)

Rivlin-Etzion M, Marmor O, Saban G, Rosin B, Haber SN, Vaadia E, Prut Y, Bergman H.

J Neurosci. 2008 Jan 16;28(3):633-49. (2008)

Slovin H, Abeles M, Vaadia E, Haalman I, Prut Y, Bergman H.

J Neurophysiol. 1999 Feb;81(2):858-74. (1999)

Prut Y, Vaadia E, Bergman H, Haalman I, Slovin H, Abeles M.

J Neurophysiol. 1998 Jun;79(6):2857-74. (1998)

Vaadia E, Haalman I, Abeles M, Bergman H, Prut Y, Slovin H, Aertsen A.

Nature. 1995 Feb 9;373(6514):515-8. (1995)

Abeles M, Prut Y, Bergman H, Vaadia E.

Prog Brain Res. 1994;102:395-404. (1994)

Nelken I, Prut Y, Vaadia E, Abeles M.

Hear Res. 1994 Jan;72(1-2):206-22. (1994)

Nelken I, Prut Y, Vaadia E, Abeles M.

Hear Res. 1994 Jan;72(1-2):237-53. (1994)

MSc student position.

PhD student position.

Postdoctoral trainee position.

Our lab uses electrophysiology, imaging tools and behavioral perturbations to study how interactions in the motor system lead to motor behavior and motor learning. We develop novel experimental paradigms and employ advanced methods for data analysis to probe the system in health and disease. Our lab has a broad network of local and international collaborations which provides ample training opportunities.

We accept highly motivated students with diverse backgrounds including Biology, Cognitive Sciences, Computer Science, Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, etc.

Further details: For more information, please contact Yifat Prut yifat.prut@mail.huji.ac.il

Yifat Prut

Professor

Phone: +972-2-6757912
Fax: +972-2-6439736
Address: The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences
The Suzanne and Charles Goodman Brain Sciences Building,
Level 3, Room 1304A Edmond J. Safra Campus,
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 9190401

“Working memory”